January 23, 2022

Blog @ Munaf Sheikh

Latest news from tech-feeds around the world.

candela raises €24M investment for silent flying watercraft production


C-8 offers a superior experience at sea

 

watercraft maker candela goes one step further for the realization of C-8 long-range, all-electric craft that travels silently above the water surface. following the P-30 electric hydrofoil ferry that flies above the water, now the swedish tech firm announced that has raised €24M investment from EQT ventures to scale the production of these vessels.

 

merging advanced aircraft technology with software and electronics, C-8 soars above the waves in absolute silence compare to conventional electric powerboats. the active hydrofoil system stabilizes the vessels in-flight using computer power and advanced software that provides a smooth experience at sea, without bouncing up and down. without creating huge swells, this craft leaves no wake behind, all the while offering all the amenities and comfort for the passengers.

all images by candela

 

 

reducing energy consumption to 20%

 

candela’s fast-growing research and development team consists of leading engineers from the aerospace, software, and electronics industries. as they mentioned, the new capital will boost the company’s already substantial cash influx and will be used to triple research and development, invest in production automation, and scale up the sales organization to meet worldwide demands.

 

unlike a normal keeled boat, the craft includes a set of computer-guided underwater wings —known as hydrofoils— that reduce energy consumption to 20%. the overall design takes shape as an open day cruiser or a sheltered hardtop with a retractable sunroof. as for the interior, the cabin can accommodate two adults and two children. meanwhile, the optional premium sound system with a subwoofer and six speakers allows for a unique concert experience on board.

candela raises €24M investment for silent flying watercraft production
in extreme weather conditions, C-8 can convert to a conventional boat

 

 

a combination of long all-electric range and high speed

 

candela is the first in the global boating industry that offers a combination of long all-electric range and high speed. starting out with the prototype C-7 speedboat, now, the company is building on this success with the mass market candela C-8, a day cruiser that the company has close to 100 orders for, just three months after launch.

 

funds will be allocated to complement the company’s stockholm facility with an additional highly automated factory, which will produce the candela C-8 alongside the commercial vessels launched earlier this year: the shuttle ferry candela P-30 and the water taxi candela P-12. 

 

candela raises €24M investment for silent flying watercraft production
its hull is vacuum infused from 100% carbon fiber, which allows the weight to be significantly less than similar boats

 

‘by scaling its mature and market-proven hydrofoil tech to commercial vessels, candela envisions to have a big impact on the sizable CO2 emissions caused by fast coastal shipping worldwide. marine transports are responsible for 4 to 5 percent of the world’s annual CO2 emissions,’ mentioned the company. ‘by combining sustainability with lower operational costs, candela foresees that the company’s electric passenger vessels will drive the transition away from ice ships even faster than for leisure boats.’

candela raises €24M investment for silent flying watercraft production
ample storage space, a marine head and dimmable LED lights creates a perfect sea experience

 

‘the candela P-30 ferry – the world’s first electric hydrofoil passenger vessel – has been commissioned by the region of stockholm, where it is set to commence traffic in 2023. it will shuttle passengers to and from the city’s vast archipelago. according to the region’s calculations, candela P-30’s energy-saving hydrofoil system will shed operational costs by 42% compared to current diesel vessels, as well as allow for faster travel and more frequent departures.’



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