May 25, 2022

Blog @ Munaf Sheikh

Latest news from tech-feeds around the world.

tada masaharu revitalizes 120-years-old townhouse in japan


 

 

renovation of machiya in marutamachi 

 

tada masaharu and endo shojiro have revitalized a 120-years-old townhouse in kyoto city, japan, to accommodate a family with children. in a typical narrow and long site, the design team sought to combine traditional architectural elements with modern interventions, shaping a flexible layout that can adapt to daily life changes. white cubes are scattered throughout the structure, taking on the functions of the house. these floating boxes in combination with the exposed beams and the gaps formed in between add a playful touch to an otherwise traditional house. all images by matsumura kohei

 

 

new elements are merged with traditional 

 

tada masaharu and endo shojiro designed a series of spaces with slightly different heights and various gaps to allow a flow of the gaze. by doing so, they wanted to enhance the verticality of the interior, even though the entire building spans only 6 meters. the gaps and omissions between the volumes and the existing columns, beams, walls, and floors create visual continuity throughout the entire space. 

 

the floor of the children’s room is raised by 600 mm, gently to connect the upper and lower floors. in this way, the residents have eye access to the first floor, creating an interaction between the members of the family. with this project, the architects invite the guests to enjoy a collection of many small spaces while experiencing the richness of the traditional house. meanwhile, a garden decorated with lanterns, chozubachi, stones, and a collection of masterpieces collected by grandparents and the former landlord, add traditional japanese touches to a more contemporary design. 

different heights and various gaps form renovated 120-years-old townhouse in japan
beyond the kitchen cube, the toilet cube is floating

different heights and various gaps form renovated 120-years-old townhouse in japan
an opening looking towards the children’s room on the second floor



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